Sep 19

summerscourtney:

It has been A Week. A really good one! Here is a round-up:

The ALL THE RAGE cover was revealed on MTV by katrosenfield, who I am a huge fan of. (Have you read her novels? She is so good, so so good.) In anticipation of its release, the first chapter went live the day before and you can read it here. I’m so thrilled and grateful to everyone who shared in the excitement with me and helped spread the word about both. Thank you so much.

ARCs are in!!!! The second picture in this set is courtesy St. Martin’s Press’ Griffin Teen Twitter. A few hours later, my own copies arrived. (Obligatory headcrab shot.) I will be launching my newsletter in October, and I will be giving one of these beauties away to a random subscriber when the first issue launches. There’s still time to subscribe, soooo….

Related: can’t describe how good it felt to hold in my hands after working on it for so long. 

Meanwhile, my good friend catagator wrote an extraordinarily kind blog entry about ALL THE RAGE (so kind) and is super super super generously giving away 3 pre-orders of the book to US/CAN residents. You can check that out and enter here. (I hope you will!) Thank you a whole bunch, Kelly.

I had THE BEST time doing a podcast with sarahmoon and andantepiano over at Clear Eyes, Full Shelves. We talked for over three hours about All Manner of Things and the last installment went live on their website this week. You can listen to Part One, Part Two and Part Three respectively by clicking on each of the links. I have a been a long-time fan of their podcast (you should subscribe) and being a guest on it was a big deal for me. And fun and funny as hell. True story: Sarah had to adjust the audio levels when I started talking about Supernatural because that is how ahem passionate I get about the show. Thank you so much, ladies!

PLEASE REMAIN CALM, the sequel e-novella to my zombie novel, THIS IS NOT A TEST, is in its last stages of editing and we have a cover! It’s pretty sweet and I can’t wait to show it to you. The release is slated ahead of ALL THE RAGE, so you will be able to buy it within the first few months of 2015. I will share when there is a firm release date. Like all my best laid plans when novel-writing, the story evolved A LOT while I wrote it. I hope you dig what happens next…

Also, getting PLEASE REMAIN CALM handed in is why I’m behind on my ask box! I have some outstanding asks waiting for my attention and I hope to get to them in the next two weeks. My email situation is similar. If you have been waiting to hear back from me about anything, hopefully you’ll be getting a reply soon. Thank you so much for your patience!

Here this heart is for you, I don’t need it because I have to go make some characters sad and it only gets in the way <3

(via yaseriesinsiders)


fuck-yeah-feminist:

Crushed it.


Like a girl is not an insult

fuck-yeah-feminist:

Crushed it.

Like a girl is not an insult

(via yabooknerdlibrarian)


theallycarter:

Grace Blakely is absolutely certain of three things:
1. She is not crazy.2. Her mother was murdered.3. Someday she is going to find the killer and make him pay.
As certain as Grace is about these facts, nobody else believes her–so there’s no one she can completely trust. Not her grandfather, a powerful ambassador. Not her new friends, who all live on Embassy Row. Not Alexei, the Russian boy next door who is keeping an eye on Grace for reasons she neither likes nor understands.
Everybody wants Grace to put on a pretty dress and a pretty smile, blocking out all her unpretty thoughts. But they can’t control Grace–no more than Grace can control what she knows or what she needs to do.
Her past has come back to hunt her …  and if she doesn’t stop it, Grace isn’t the only one who will get hurt. Because on Embassy Row, the countries of the world all stand like dominoes, and one wrong move can make them all fall down.

Official cover AND back cover copy AND a two chapter excerpt?! Oh happy day!
All Fall Down: an Embassy Row novel, coming January 27, 2015.

theallycarter:

Grace Blakely is absolutely certain of three things:

1. She is not crazy.
2. Her mother was murdered.
3. Someday she is going to find the killer and make him pay.

As certain as Grace is about these facts, nobody else believes her–so there’s no one she can completely trust. Not her grandfather, a powerful ambassador. Not her new friends, who all live on Embassy Row. Not Alexei, the Russian boy next door who is keeping an eye on Grace for reasons she neither likes nor understands.

Everybody wants Grace to put on a pretty dress and a pretty smile, blocking out all her unpretty thoughts. But they can’t control Grace–no more than Grace can control what she knows or what she needs to do.

Her past has come back to hunt her …  and if she doesn’t stop it, Grace isn’t the only one who will get hurt. Because on Embassy Row, the countries of the world all stand like dominoes, and one wrong move can make them all fall down.

Official cover AND back cover copy AND a two chapter excerpt?! Oh happy day!

All Fall Down: an Embassy Row novel, coming January 27, 2015.


brandycolbert:

bethanyhagen:

So I just read this insanely beautiful book called POINTE by brandycolbert.  And I’m kind of obsessed with it now.  It’s got it all—ballet and darkness and hot guys and creepy guys and FEELS.  Plus it was beautiful written.  Plus there are Themes Which Are Haunting, which makes this an amazing book to give to my teen and adult library patrons.
And I liked it so much that I’d like to give away a copy!  The task to win is deceptively simple: you must guess my favorite dance movie.  Which is a movie where dancing is a substantial and central part of the story, and I’ll even give you a bonus hint, it’s not Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo.  You’re welcome.

Reblogging not because I want to win a copy of my own book, but because bethanyhagen has just made my day with this lovely post (so, so happy you connected with it, Bethany!) and I think YOU should try to win a copy of my book. Yes, I do.
(Also, is there any other favorite dance movie besides Center Stage? IS THERE.)

Reblogging because this an amazing book and it deserves a signal boost

brandycolbert:

bethanyhagen:

So I just read this insanely beautiful book called POINTE by brandycolbert.  And I’m kind of obsessed with it now.  It’s got it all—ballet and darkness and hot guys and creepy guys and FEELS.  Plus it was beautiful written.  Plus there are Themes Which Are Haunting, which makes this an amazing book to give to my teen and adult library patrons.

And I liked it so much that I’d like to give away a copy!  The task to win is deceptively simple: you must guess my favorite dance movie.  Which is a movie where dancing is a substantial and central part of the story, and I’ll even give you a bonus hint, it’s not Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo.  You’re welcome.

Reblogging not because I want to win a copy of my own book, but because bethanyhagen has just made my day with this lovely post (so, so happy you connected with it, Bethany!) and I think YOU should try to win a copy of my book. Yes, I do.

(Also, is there any other favorite dance movie besides Center Stage? IS THERE.)

Reblogging because this an amazing book and it deserves a signal boost

(via yahighway)


Sep 17

diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:

Hunt for Jade Dragon (Michael Vey 4) by Richard Paul Evans (Simon Pulse/Mercury Ink)

Book Description: Michael, Taylor, Ostin and the rest of the Electroclan head to China in search of a girl who may have discovered why Michael and his friends became electric. Her name is Lin Julung, or Jade Dragon, and she’s a child prodigy with an IQ higher than Einstein’s—and Ostin’s.

But Hatch gets to her first, and the Elgen are holding her prisoner in their Taiwan Starxource plant. Now the Voice wants Michael and the Electroclan to go to Taiwan and free her before Hatch can realize his dreams of an army of electric children.

The hunt for Jade Dragon is on, and it’s a race against time!

Everything Changes by Samantha Hale (Bold Strokes Books)

Book Description: Seventeen-year-old Raven Walker has never had a boyfriend. She’s never really been interested in boys. But she was always too afraid to examine what that might mean. Until she meets Morgan O’Shea and finds herself inexplicably drawn to her.

As their friendship develops, Raven is forced to face the possibility that her interest in Morgan might actually be attraction and that she might be gay.

Acknowledging the possibility opens Raven’s world to the excitement of her first romance, but it also leaves her struggling to come to terms with her sexuality and the impact it will have on her relationships with her family and friends.

Ashes to Ashes by Jenny Han and Siobhan Vivian (Simon & Schuster)

“Han and Vivian complete their revenge-fueled trilogy with twists, turns, and intrigue, along with plenty of action to keep the plot rocketing along. Teens who have read the first two installments will be clamoring for this conclusion.” — School Library Journal

Dark Tide by Greg Herren (Bold Strokes Books)

Book Description: For Ricky Hackworth, a summer job to save money before he leaves for college is a necessity. When he lands a job as a lifeguard at the Mermaid Inn in Latona, Alabama, on the beautiful Gulf Coast, it’s like a dream come true. But once he moves into the Inn, he starts hearing stories about the lifeguard from the previous summer and how he vanished without a trace right in the middle of the summer. Before long, Ricky realizes the Inn and the town are hiding some dark secrets…secrets someone is willing to kill to protect, and Ricky has to find out the truth before he, too, vanishes without a trace.

Evidence of Things Not Seen by Lindsey Lane (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Book Description: When high school junior Tommy Smythe goes missing, everyone has a theory about what happened to him. He was an odd kid, often deeply involved in particle physics, so maybe he just got distracted and wandered off. He was last seen at a pullout off the highway, so maybe someone snatched him. Tommy believes that everything is possible, and that until something can be proven false, it may be true. So as long as Tommy’s whereabouts are undetermined, he could literally be anywhere.

Told in a series of first-person narratives from people who knew Tommy, Evidence of Things Not Seen by award-winning author Lindsey Lane explores themes of loneliness, connectedness, and the role we play in creating our own realities.

Get Even by Gretchen McNeil (Balzer + Bray)

Book Description: Bree Deringer, Olivia Hayes, Kitty Wei, and Margot Mejia have nothing in common. At least that’s what they’d like the students and administrators of their elite private school to think. The girls have different goals, different friends, and different lives, but they share one very big secret: They’re all members of Don’t Get Mad, a secret society that anonymously takes revenge on the school’s bullies, mean girls, and tyrannical teachers.

But when their latest target ends up dead with a blood-soaked “DGM” card in his hands, the girls realize that they’re not as anonymous as they thought—and that someone now wants revenge on them.

As the unlikely group searches for the killer, they also uncover secrets and lies that rock their tenuous friendship to the core. Soon the clues are piling up, the police are closing in … and everyone has something to lose.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson (Dial)

“Twins Noah and Jude are inseparable until misunderstandings, jealousies, and a major loss rip them apart. Both are talented artists, and creating art plays a major role in their narratives. Both also struggle with their sexuality—Noah is gay, which both thrills and terrifies him, while Jude is recovering from a terrible first sexual experience at age 14, one of two important reasons she has sworn off dating. … Nelson’s novel brims with emotion (grief, longing, and love in particular) as Noah, Jude, and the broken individuals in their lives find ways to heal.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Searching for Grace by Juliann Rich (Bold Strokes Books)

Book Description: Camp is over and Jonathan Cooper returns home—to life with his mother whose silence is worse than anything she could say, to his varsity soccer teammates at East Bay Christian Academy, to the growing rumors about what he did with a boy last summer at Bible camp.

All the important lines blur. Between truth and lies. Between friends and enemies. Between reality and illusion.

Just when Jonathan feels the most alone, help arrives from the unlikeliest of sources: Frances “Sketch” Mallory, the weird girl from his art class, and her equally eccentric friend, Mason. For a short while, thanks to Sketch and Mason, life is almost survivable. Then Ian McGuire comes to town on the night of the homecoming dance and tensions explode. Fists fly, blood flows, and Jonathan—powerless to stop it—does the only thing he believes might save them all: he prays for God’s grace.

(via yahighway)



Sep 16

epicreads:

Book trailer for MADE FOR YOU by Melissa Marr!



svyalitchat:

Talking about sexual violence in young adult literature with a teen book club, by Amanda MacGregor

A few months ago, I asked my teen book club if they were interested in discussing sexual violence in young adult literature at an upcoming meeting. I explained a little about the Sexual Violence in Young Adult Literature Project and sent them links to past pieces about topics on TLT that I thought would be useful to inform our discussion. They were all really into this idea. I made it clear to them that this was a sensitive and potentially upsetting and triggering subject to be discussing, and that it was fine to decide to skip this meeting, or to want to come but not talk, or to get up and leave during the meeting. I assured them no explanation was necessary if they wanted to do any of these things. Our group has been meeting for two years and the teens are all incredibly thoughtful and respectful. Every month we either read a specific book, or read around a theme or project (such as reading for the library’s Battle of the Books), or just talk about what we’ve been reading on our own. Because YA books often cover important and complex subjects, the group is used to having in-depth conversations about serious issues.

When we held our SVYALit meeting, 10 teens were in attendance. After a few months of flagging attendance, this was one of the best attended meetings we’d had all spring. The group this day consisted of four boys and six girls. They ranged in age from 8th grade to 12th grade. I had supplied them with a booklist in advance of possible titles to read, and had a cart available at the previous meeting with many of these titles. My hope was that everyone would read something different, to give us a wide view of what sexual violence looks like in YA lit.


Usually our meetings are very informal. I try to direct some of the conversation, but usually it’s a little chaotic, with everyone jumping in or going off on tangents. There is usually good natured arguing over opinions on books and lots of laughter. This meeting, though, was different. I’ve never seen the book club members so quiet while listening to someone talk. I began by giving them some background information on rape statistics (from RAINN) and rape culture, most of which I pulled from the archives of the SVYALit projectwebsite.
I read them pieces from various posts on the SVYALit website, including this from an April 8, 2014 post titled “Not aPunch Line, Not Something Everyone Should Go Through: Sexual Assault and WhatWe Can Do In the Library to Help Our Teens”:
  
“Sexual assault is not just rape. Inappropriate touching, groping, forced kissing, any type of unwanted contact that can be considered sexual is sexual assault. Male, female, trans, bi, not sure of what gender, not claiming a binary gender, gay straight, anyone on the Rainbow or not claiming anything: it can happen to anyone, by anyone. You can be assaulted by those older than you, those younger, those in positions of power, those you are married to, those you are engaged to, related to, or complete strangers to.”


I read them this piece to make it clear what sexual assault is and to point out that it can happen to anyone and be perpetuated by anyone. I wanted them to hear these words, to listen to someone making it clear for them that sexual assault can happen in a lot of different ways. For their own sakes, I wanted them to know this, to really understand it.
A few of the book club members were familiar with the term “rape culture,” but many were not. I read them this explanation of rape culture from the blog Shakesville in an October 9, 2009 post titled “Rape Culture 101” (linked to from a Buzzfeed article via the SVYALit project index under “additional resources”):
      
“Rape culture is telling girls and women to be careful about what you wear, how you wear it, how you carry yourself, where you walk, when you walk there, with whom you walk, whom you trust, what you do, where you do it, with whom you do it, what you drink, how much you drink, whether you make eye contact, if you’re alone, if you’re with a stranger, if you’re in a group, if you’re in a group of strangers, if it’s dark, if the area is unfamiliar, if you’re carrying something, how you carry it, what kind of shoes you’re wearing in case you have to run, what kind of purse you carry, what jewelry you wear, what time it is, what street it is, what environment it is, how many people you sleep with, what kind of people you sleep with, who your friends are, to whom you give your number, who’s around when the delivery guy comes, to get an apartment where you can see who’s at the door before they can see you, to check before you open the door to the delivery guy, to own a dog or a dog-sound-making machine, to get a roommate, to take self-defense, to always be alert always pay attention always watch your back always be aware of your surroundings and never let your guard down for a moment lest you be sexually assaulted and if you are and didn’t follow all the rules it’s your fault.”

You could have heard a pin drop after I read this. They were silent as I read, some of them occasionally nodding at certain parts. My usually extremely talkative group was, for once, without words. I let that passage settle in for a minute, then we moved on.
I include these long passages I read to them to show the sort of set-up we did before discussing the books. We discussed a little bit about what, if anything, they talk about in health class regarding sexual violence and consent. They all agreed that rape was not talked about in school. The book club members this day represented four schools. They said they don’t remember any talk about consent in their health classes. One of the girls said the class was more focused on information about STDs, pregnancy, “and scaring kids away from sex.” She said they briefly talked about dating violence (such as hitting) and suicide, but never about rape. I asked them to think about what books they’ve read in their literature classes that might address anything about sexual violence. While they could think of many that included violence (and lead to class discussions about violence), the only thing anyone had read in school that addressed sexual violence was Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. I pointed to the large stack of books we’d collected where sexual violence is a part of the story. They thought it was interesting that these stories were being told, but no one was talking to them about them. 

 The books we discussed at this meeting were:
What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton
Charm & Strange by Stephanie Kuehn
Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Living Dead Girl by Elizabeth Scott
Easy by Tamara Webber
Sold by Patricia McCormick
The Mockingbirds by Daisy Whitney

Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian
Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller
Hush by Eishes Chayil
Fault Line by Christa Desir

I asked the teens to think about this quote as we talked about the books we read, from Karen Jensen’s answer to a question on the SVYALit blog about teaching teens to think critically about books with sexual violence in them (in an April 2, 2014 post). Karen says:
“When I think about equipping readers, I think about making us really examine whether or not the way that sexual violence is used in a book is 1) necessary and 2) contributes in any meaningful way to breaking down rape culture. This I think is an important way to consider the books that we read, by asking ourselves if the inclusion of sexual violence is simply used as a narrative device … or if it is an essential part of the story that is used effectively. And when I say is used effectively, what I mean is that it doesn’t engage in victim blaming or slut shaming, it doesn’t minimize the crime that sexual violence is, and that it doesn’t gloss over the very real effects of sexual violence in the life of its characters.”

These books showed the different ways rape can happen, the ways various people react, and the ways they cope or don’t cope. We went around the circle and each book club member gave a summary of his or her book, including how the sexual violence occurred and what happened after it. If others had read the same book, they jumped in with additional thoughts. By talking about these books, we also talked about kidnapping, lawsuits, suicide, repeated childhood sexual abuse, family and friend reactions, and depression. We talked about slut shaming and victim blaming. We touched on recovery, compassion, shame, healing, triggers, and relationships post-rape. One girl pointed out that she wished we had seen one book where the character went directly to the police, was believed, and started a process of legal proceedings and recovery. She noted that we saw very little police involvement in most of the books, and when we did it was often late in the story. For many of the books, we discussed what role parental involvement played in the stories. In some cases, where parents noticed their child was suffering or depressed, or suspected that perhaps something had happened to cause these changes, they turned a blind eye and chose not to address it. We talked about how often teenagers are told to turn to a parent or other trusted adult when something serious happens, but in many cases in these books, the adults failed to take action or seemed unapproachable. (See also: Silence Hurts Everyone, why don’t adult intervene more when abuse is suspected.)

After the meeting, some of the members chose to send me further thoughts. One member shared with me that this was the first time she discussed sexual violence with a group. “I liked how comfortable I felt discussing what I had read with the group. In other situations, mentioning to someone that I had read a book about sexual violence usually ended with an odd look and an abrupt ending to any discussion I had hoped to spark.” She goes on to say that she valued the open discussion we had. “It’s what I wish I could have with a teacher, a friend, even a sibling without feeling weird for bringing it up.” She says she wishes we had had even more time to discuss our books and this topic because talking “about a topic that society seems to shy away from isn’t an opportunity I get often.”
Another member wrote, “This was the first time I’ve read a book about sexual violence. It made me feel uncomfortable because the character wasn’t able to do anything to stop what was happening. I wish she could have.”

I was proud of how respectful and insightful the book club members were during this meeting. We could easily have spent multiple meetings discussing this topic. Though the subject was, obviously, very serious and at times difficult to talk about, one member smartly pointed out, “the only thing that made me uncomfortable with this topic was that these fictional stories are something that is happening daily to real people.” For many of the teens, it was the first time they really considered sexual violence in literature and in real life. I hope other teen book clubs are taking the opportunity to utilize the SVYALit resources and tackling this subject in their meetings. The experience our book club had was invaluable, and I think we all walked away feeling much more educated about sexual violence not just in literature but in life. To be able to speak openly about such a loaded subject was revolutionary for most of these teenagers. As one member wrote, “Working to rid the topic of its taboo is a great step in bringing awareness and change, and I think YA books written about sexual violence are doing this.” 
Amanda MacGregor has worked in both public and high school libraries. She reviews for School Library Journal, Voice of Youth Advocates, and the Horn Book Guide. Find her online at www.citesomething.com and on Twitter @citesomething.


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